NEW HOPE ON M5 NOISE IN DROITWICH – BUT IT COULD TAKE EIGHT YEARS
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NEW HOPE ON M5 NOISE IN DROITWICH – BUT IT COULD TAKE EIGHT YEARS

The campaign to reduce noise from the M5 in and around Droitwich took a new twist this week as it was revealed that as well as resurfacing with a low noise surface, other steps to reduce the nuisance may be taken. But the letter from the Highways Agency breaking this news also said it could be 2020 before the measures were introduced.

Peter Luff, the MP for Droitwich, has been campaigning for many years now to ease the suffering of his constituents who live near the M5 around Droitwich. In reply to his most recent letter to the Highways Agency on the subject, a director of the organisation, Ginny Clarke, revealed the new development.

The letter repeated the pledge to resurface the motorway with a low noise surface when it needed it, but warned that,

“At present the surface of the M5 near Droitwich is not showing signs of significant deterioration … and there are no plans for a major resurfacing there in the near future.”

However, the letter went on to discuss the implications of the 2006 Environmental Noise Regulations and the adoption in March 2010 by the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) of noise action maps for English roads. These maps identified first priority areas for action, where noise levels exceeded 76 decibels, and land to the east of Cockshute Hill is included.

In her letter, Ginny Clarke explained,

“We have recently completed the investigation of these types of area, including alongside the M5 near Droitwich to identify what, if any, noise mitigation measures could be installed by 2020/21. … We are currently finalising reports of all investigations, which will be sent to relevant local authorities for consultation from April 2012 onwards. … We are not able to confirm at this stage when any specific noise attenuation m measures will be installed.”

Commenting, Peter Luff said,

“What this does show is the value of not giving up on the issue. The Highways Agency now accepts that something does need to be done. Now we have to keep on campaigning until they do it. The noise is intolerable and it’s time to end it. Eight more years of misery is just too long.”

ENDS


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